HARVARD
Materials Research Science and Engineering Center
 
 
 
Nuggets

Curves Alter Crystallization

Scientists have studied crystallization since the time of Galileo, so it's easy to imagine there's nothing new to learn about the process. Work reported by MRSEC researchers Manoharan, Nelson, and coworkers in Science (Feb. 7, 2014), however, has uncovered a previously unseen phenomenon — that curved surfaces can dramatically alter the shape of crystals as they form (above). The finding could have applications ranging from applying coatings to nanoparticles used in industry to aiding in drug delivery, and may even help shed light on how viruses assemble.

MRSEC Research Year:

2014

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2014

Electrogels
Electrically Collapsible Hydrogels with Enhanced
Mechanical Toughness

Magnetic Gels
Biphasic Design Enhances the Mechanical Properties
of Magnetically Responsive Hydrogel

New Morphological Instability
in Plastic Fluids

Pull Spinning
Novel Technique for Production of Nanofibers

Curves Alter Crystallization

Thermal Excitations of Warped Membranes

Sensor Skin
A Platform for Highly Stretchable,
Biocompatible, Transparent Sensors

Inducing Chirality
Buckling-induced Reversible Symmetry Breaking
and Amplification of Chirality

Odd Performance Under Pressure
Soft Auxetic Materials with Negative Poisson's Ratio

Printing Tissue
3D Bioprinting of Vascularized,
Heterogeneous Cell-Laden Tissue Constructs

Impacting Drops
Drops Skating and Bouncing Off Surfaces

Mentoring Veterans
Building a Long-Term Support Network

Shared Experimental Facilities
New TA Discovery Rheometers

International Soft-Matter Workshops
Dutch Soft Matter Days