Calendar of MRSEC Events

2021 Events

December, 2021
89th New England Complex Fluids meeting
Harvard University
September, 2021
88th New England Complex Fluids meeting
Brandeis University
June 25, 2021
87th New England Complex Fluids meeting
MIT
May 25, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Matthieu Piel
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Title: TBA


May 18, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Lillian Fritz-Laylin
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Title: TBA

Allyson Sgro
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Title: TBA


May 4, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Marino Arroyo
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Crawling of Euglena cells by large-amplitude shape changes

Katy Rothenberg
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Title: TBA


April 27, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Rashmi Priya
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Local tension imbalance drives global organ patterning and fate specification

Mohit Kumar Jolly
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Title: TBA


April 20, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Jude Phillip
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Title: TBA

Shashank Shekhar
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Multicomponent molecular mechanisms of actin dynamics regulation in motile cells


April 17, 2021
2021 MSI Symposium
April 13, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Johanna Ivaska
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Forces and membrane traffic in cancer cell migration


April 6, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Jim Bear
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Title: TBA


March 30, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Celeste Nelson
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Title: TBA


March 23, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Robert Fischer
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Riding the wave: how ECM waves can depolarize cancer cells

Isabelle Caille
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Primary cilium-dependent cAMP/PKA signalling at the centrosome regulates neuronal migration


March 16, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Spoorthi Subramaniam
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Guidance mechanisms involved in melanocyte patterning and survival

Jorg Renkawitz
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Leukocyte navigation in 3D microenvironments


March 11, 2021
MSI Thursday Seminar Series
Dr. Arash Komeili, UC Berkeley
12 - 1pm EST | Remote meeting

The ins and outs of bacterial organelles

Abstract: Open any biology textbook and you are likely to learn that, in contrast to eukaryotes, bacteria do not contain organelles to compartmentalize and facilitate cellular functions. However, numerous protein- and lipid-bounded organelles are known to exist within a diverse array of bacterial species. In my group, we look at the process of compartmentalization at a molecular level in order to understand the origins and functions of bacterial organelles and exploit them for future applications. I will discuss our work on the biogenesis and subcellular organization of the magnetic magnetosome organelles of magnetotactic bacteria and our recent discovery of ferrosomes—iron-accumulating compartments that define a novel class of bacterial organelles.

Register for MSI Thursday Seminar Series

March 11, 2021
Nelson Group Meeting @ Harvard
Michael Hagan, Brandeis University
1pm EST | Remote meeting

Principles of Self-Limiting Assembly

Self-assembly of simple subunits into multi-subunit structures with increased complexity and functionality underlies many biological processes and is becoming an important route to bottom-up materials design. In this talk I will consider a special class of self-assembly processes --- self-limiting assembly --- defined as an assembly process that autonomously terminates at an equilibrium structure with a well-defined, finite size that is much larger than the size of individual subunits. I will begin with an overview of the basic statistical mechanical framework that describes the thermodynamics of self-assembly. With this framework, I will introduce the physical ingredients that are required to achieve self-limited assembly. I will then discuss three (time permitting) examples of self-limiting assembly, with results from theoretical and computational modeling as well as from experiments by collaborators: (1) Bacterial microcompartments, which are ‘organelles’ inside of bacteria, consisting of large icosahedral protein shells that assemble around collections of enzymes; (2) Synthetic capsids (icosahedral shells) formed by self-assembling DNA origami subunits; and (3) Tubules whose self-assembly terminates at a well-defined length due to geometric frustration.

March 9, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Bojana Gligorijevic
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Real-time microscopy of invasive cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment context

March 5, 2021
86th New England Complex Fluids meeting
University of Rhode Island
March 2, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Eva Crosas Molist
11am - noon | Remote meeting

AMPK is a mechano-metabolic sensor linking mitochondrial dynamics to Myosin II dependent cell migration

Vicky Sans Moreno
11am - noon | Remote meeting

The actomyosin cytoskeleton in cancer: cell migration and beyond

February 25, 2021
Nelson Group Meeting @ Harvard
Changyeob Baek, Harvard University
1pm EST | Remote meeting

Principles of Self-Limiting Assembly

First, I'll present triaxial weaving, a craft technique used to generate surfaces using tri-directional arrays of initially straight elastic ribbons. We achieve smooth, three-dimensional weaved structures by prescribing in-plane curvatures to the flat ribbons. The potential of this novel design scheme is demonstrated with a few canonical target shapes.

Second, I'll present the mechanics of two elastic rods in a crossing contact, whose geometric counterpart is often referred to in the mathematics community as a ‘clasp.' We compare our experimental and computational results to a well-established description for ideal clasps of geometrically rigid strings, finding that the latter acts as an underlying ‘backbone’ for the full elasticity solution.


February 23, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Samantha Payne
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Cortical actin properties controlled by Drosophila Fos aid macrophage infiltration against surrounding tissue resistance

Madeleine Oudin
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Title: TBA

February 16, 2021
Cell Migration Seminars
Vera Belyaeva
4 - 5pm | Remote meeting

Cortical actin properties controlled by Drosophila Fos aid macrophage infiltration against surrounding tissue resistance

Marcus Bischoff
11am - noon | Remote meeting

Coordination of cytoskeletal dynamics during the transition from migration to apical constriction during Drosophila abdominal morphogenesis

February 11, 2021
MSI Thursday Seminar Series
Dr. Severine Atis, Duke University
1pm EST | Remote meeting

Growing in flows: from evolutionary dynamics to microbial jet


Abstract: Biological systems can self-organize in complex structures, able to evolve and adapt to widely varying environmental conditions. Despite the importance of fluid flow for transporting and organizing populations, few laboratory systems exist to systematically investigate the impact of advection on their spatial evolutionary dynamics. In this talk, I will show how we can address this problem by studying the morphology and genetic spatial structure of microbial colonies growing on the surface of a viscous substrate. I will illustrate how the interplay between microbial growth geometry, metabolic activity and fluid flows can generate positive feedback with the environment and lead to accelerated propagation, fragmentation of the initial colony and the formation of growing microbial jets.

Bio: Dr. Severine Atis is a postdoctoral fellow in the physics department at the University of Chicago where she studies self-organization in active fluids in Professor William Irvine's group. She received her PhD from Sorbonne University in Physics where she worked with reaction wave propagation in disordered flows. She joined Professor David Nelson’s group at Harvard University as a postdoctoral scholar where she worked on evolutionary dynamics coupled with hydrodynamic flows in collaboration with Professor Andrew Murray in the department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.



January 14, 2021
Nelson Group Meeting @ Harvard
Michaels Rubenstein, Duke University
1pm EST | Remote meeting

The neverending story of fantastic rings, loops, and hoops and where to find them in melts, gels, and nuclei



Prior Events